John Murray

Reformed Audio Presents: John Murray

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“Union with Christ is the central truth of the whole doctrine of salvation. All to which the people of God have been predestined in the eternal decree of God, all that has been secured and procured for them in the once-for-all accomplishment of redemption, all of which they become the actual partakers in the application of redemption, and all that by God’s grace they will become in the state of consummated bliss is embraced within the compass of union and communion with Christ. . . . Union with Christ reaches its zenith in adoption and adoption has its orbit in union with Christ. The people of God are ‘heirs of God and joint-heirs with Christ’ (Rom. 8:17). All things are theirs whether life or death or things present or things to come, all are theirs, because they are Christ’s and Christ is God’s (I Cor. 3:22, 23). They are united to him in whom are hid all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge and they are complete in him who is the head of all principality and power.”

Definitive Sanctification

Definitive Sanctification


The Fourth Commandment According to Westminster Standards

 


Why We Baptize Infants

Why We Baptize Infants


John Murray (October 14, 1898 – May 8, 1975) was a Scottish-born Calvinist theologian who taught at Princeton Seminary and then left to help found Westminster Theological Seminary, where he taught for many years. Murray was born in the croft of Badbea, near Bonar Bridge, in Sutherland county, Scotland. Following service in the British Army in the First World War (during which he lost an eye) he studied at the University of Glasgow. Following his acceptance as a theological student of the Free Church of Scotland he pursued further studies at Princeton Seminary under J. Gresham Machen and Geerhardus Vos. He taught at Princeton for a year and then lectured in systematic theology at Westminster Theological Seminary to generations of students from 1930 to 1966, and was an early trustee of the Banner of Truth Trust. Besides the material in the four-volume Collected Writings, his primary published works are a commentary on the Epistle to the Romans (previously included in the New International Commentary on the New Testament series but now superseded by Douglas J. Moo’s commentary), Redemption Accomplished and Applied, Principles of Conduct, The Imputation of Adam’s Sin, Baptism, and Divorce.

Murray preached at Chesley and Lochalsh from time to time until his retirement from Westminster Theological Seminary in 1968. Writing after a communion season at Lochalsh, Murray said, “I think I feel most at home here and at Chesley of all the places I visit.” There had been some consideration that upon leaving the seminary, Murray might take a pastorate in the newly-formed Presbyterian Reformed Church, but the infirmity of his aged sisters at the home place necessitated his return to Ross-shire, Scotland.