Loraine Boettner

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“The condemnation of the non-elect is designed primarily to furnish an eternal exhibition, before men and angels, of God’s hatred for sin, or, in other words, it is to be an eternal manifestation of the justice of God. This decree displays one of the divine attributes which apart from it could never have been adequately appreciated. The salvation of some through a redeemer is designed to display the attributes of love, mercy, and holiness.” – Loraine Boettner

 

 

Millennium, Chapter 7, The World is Getting Better - Download This Audio

Loraine Boettner (1901-03-07 to 1990-01-03) was an American theologian and author. Boettner was born in Linden, Missouri. He received a Th.B. (1928) and Th.M. (1929) from Princeton Theological Seminary, and he received the honorary degrees of Doctor of Divinity (1933) and Doctor of Letters (1957). He was a member of the Orthodox Presbyterian Church. For eight years he taught Bible at Pikeville College in Kentucky, and in 1937 he began working at the Library of Congress and the Bureau of Internal Revenue. While his daily vocation was not theology or Biblical studies, he continued to write and publish books until near his death, the most successful of which were The Reformed Doctrine of Predestination and Roman Catholicism.[1] In this latter work, he took a critical view of Church history and on the institution’s public influence in American politics.